Happiness as a Reward for Torture: Is Participation in a Long-Distance Triathlon a Rational Choice?

GND
171675304
Affiliation
Center for Sport Management, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
Maxcy, Joel G.;
GND
1012862437
Affiliation
Department of Sport Economics and Sport Management, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany
Wicker, Pamela;
GND
129240990
LSF
51806
Affiliation
Department of Managerial Economics, University of Duisburg–Essen, Duisburg, Germany
Prinz, Joachim

This study applies prospect theory to an assessment of actual behavior. Loss aversion, reference dependence, and diminishing sensitivity are conceptualized through survey respondents’ perceptions of physical and mental torture during training for and competition in long-distance triathlons. Regression results show that frequent thoughts of giving up during the race negatively affect happiness after the race, while mental torture during training and race is negatively associated with happiness in the weeks after the race. Satisfaction with race outcome positively affects happiness, suggesting that achieving individual goals is more important than absolute performance in terms of finishing times and ranks.

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