In-cylinder thermographic PIV combined with phosphor thermometry using ZnO:Zn

GND
1301176478
ORCID
0000-0002-0111-4638
Affiliation
IFP Energies Nouvelles, Institut Carnot IFPEN Transports Energie, Rueil-Malmaison Cedex, France
Kopf, Andreas;
GND
1214204279
Affiliation
IFP Energies Nouvelles, Institut Carnot IFPEN Transports Energie, Rueil-Malmaison Cedex, France
Frattina, Valerio;
ORCID
0000-0002-6482-3634
Affiliation
IFP Energies Nouvelles, Institut Carnot IFPEN Transports Energie, Rueil-Malmaison Cedex, France
Bardi, Michele;
GND
1036337731
LSF
56680
Affiliation
IVG, Institute for Combustion and Gas Dynamics – Reactive Fluids, and CENIDE, Center for Nanointegration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany
Endres, Torsten;
Affiliation
IFP Energies Nouvelles, Institut Carnot IFPEN Transports Energie, Rueil-Malmaison Cedex, France
Bruneaux, Gilles;
GND
1148037985
LSF
48807
Affiliation
IVG, Institute for Combustion and Gas Dynamics – Reactive Fluids, and CENIDE, Center for Nanointegration, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany
Schulz, Christof

Two-dimensional thermographic particle image velocimetry (T-PIV) is presented for the in situ measurement in optically accessible internal combustion (IC) engines. Temperature and velocity measurements are combined using thermographic phosphor particles as tracers for PIV. For three commercially available phosphors (BAM:Eu 2+ , ZnO, and ZnO:Zn), temperature sensitivity, luminescence intensity at high temperatures and laser-fluence dependence were evaluated for phosphor-coated surfaces in a high-temperature cell. ZnO:Zn was identified as the best-suited candidate for engine in-cylinder measurements and further analyzed in the aerosolized state at temperatures up to 775 K to generate calibration data required for signal quantification in engine experiments. T-PIV was successfully applied in the IC engine to simultaneously obtain instantaneous two-dimensional velocity and temperature fields using the intensity-ratio method. Despite a measurement uncertainty (±1σ basis) of only 3.7 K at 317 K (1.2%) to 24.4 K (4.2%) at 575 K, this technique suffers from low signal intensities due to thermal quenching at increasing temperatures, which leads to reduced accuracy as the piston approaches top dead center. Thermographic measurements were successful to visualize local temperature changes due to evaporative cooling after fuel injection. The measured mean gas temperatures agreed well with zero-dimensional simulations that use additional wall-temperature measurements from thermographic phosphor measurements based on the lifetime method as input for heat transfer calculations.

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