Selective internal radiation therapy of hepatic tumors : procedural implications of a patent hepatic falciform artery

Schelhorn, Juliane LSF; Ertle, Judith LSF; Schlaak, Jörg Friedrich LSF; Müller, Stefan P. LSF; Bockisch, Andreas LSF; Schlosser, Thomas Wilfried LSF; Lauenstein, Thomas C. LSF

Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) using 90-yttrium is a local therapy for unresectable liver malignancies. Non-targeted 90-yttrium diversion via a patent hepatic falciform artery (HFA) is seen as risk for periprocedural complications. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of a patent HFA on SIRT. 606 patients with SIRT between 2006 and 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. SIRT preparation was performed by digital subtraction angiography including 99mTc-HSAM administration and subsequent SPECT/CT. Patients with an angiographically patent HFA were analyzed for procedural consequences and complications. 19 of 606 patients (3%) with an angiographically patent HFA were identified. Only 11 of these 19 patients received 90-yttrium in the hepatic vessel bed containing the HFA. Initial coil embolization of the HFA succeeded only in three of 11 patients. Out of the eight remaining patients four had no abdominal wall 99mTc-HSAM accumulation. The other four patients presented with an abdominal wall 99mTc-HSAM accumulation, for those a reattempt of HFA embolization was performed or ice packs were administered on the abdominal wall during SIRT. In summary, all patients tolerated SIRT well. A patent HFA should not be considered a SIRT contraindication. In patients with abdominal wall 99mTc-HSAM accumulation HFA embolization or ice pack administration seems to prevent complications.

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Schelhorn, J., Ertle, J., Schlaak, J.F., Müller, S.P., Bockisch, A., Schlosser, T.W., Lauenstein, T.C., 2016. Selective internal radiation therapy of hepatic tumors: procedural implications of a patent hepatic falciform artery. https://doi.org/10.1186/2193-1801-3-595
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